1930s Gibson L0 restoration – Part II

In the previous post, you saw me remove the bridge and flatten the top.  Now I’ve got to make a new bridge.

The wood of the original is a rosewood, and almost certainly brazilian, given it’s age.  With Brazilian being endangered, I selected a piece of Honduran Rosewood, which has a more brown colouration than Indian.  I was given this piece of Rosewood by The Roberto-Venn School of Luthiery when I graduated, and was one of the original shipments of wood that was used in the founding of the school.

Here I’m using a jig to drill the pin holes.

It’s beginning to look the part.

The new bridge is much taller than the old, but is the same height as it was originally, before it had been planed down to acheive a lower action. It looks good, but it’s way too light and new looking.  It needs that eighty-year-old look to it.

There we go.  A bit of stain and kncokcing off the edges, and we’re in business.  Now to fit it to the top and glue it up.

With the new bridge on, I can do the neck reset.  I can set the ew angle of the neck to coincide with the height of the new bridge.  I’ll cover that in part III.